Manually Installing The Latest Firefox in Kubuntu : A Cleaner Installation

So I’ve decided that Konqueror is just not the web browser that some people want it to be. Call me spoiled / ruined for having spent so much time on Firefox, but I just can’t use it to be as productive as I want to be so I’ve installed Firefox on my Kubuntu installation. For those of you that are in similar situations keep reading and find out how to manually install Firefox within KDE.

Open Source Gaming Review: Wormux 0.8

For anyone who ever loved and played the famous Worms PC game series, then Wormux is the game for you. Even if you weren't much of a fan (like myself) of the original Works series, you'll find Wormux none the less captivating and enjoyable, and even addictive in some respects.

Sinking Deeper - Continued Impressions of Kubuntu

Well I am a bit pleasantly surprised to say that I’m very much enjoying my time in KDE right now. There are some bugs, as is to be expected, but for the most part I’m continuing to be very productive and I’m learning a lot.

Dell Joins Countdown to Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

It’s time to give Dell a little credit, folks. By agreeing to offer Ubuntu on selected systems earlier this year, the company has opened itself up to a flood of ideas from passionate Linux users. In fact, the Dell IdeaStorm website remains flooded with thousands of Ubuntu-focused comments from the Linux community. And Dell itself continues to prepare for Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon, the next major upgrade from Canonical.

Firefox extensions for tab addicts

For Firefox users who are constantly referring to multiple pages, tabbed browsing is not a feature, but a way of life. There are enough of us that the Firefox addon page lists more than 110 extensions related to tabs. These extensions feature everything from simple add-ons to various means of saving tab addresses and sessions to thumbnails and collections of functions, as well as one or two uncategorizable ideas.

Howto Auto mount a drive in DOSBOX

DOSBox emulates an Intel x86 PC, complete with sound, graphics, mouse, modem, etc., necessary for running many old DOS games that simply cannot be run on modern PCs and operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows XP, Linux and FreeBSD. However, it is not restricted to running only games.

Ubuntu 7.10 should make Dell happy

I have just upgraded my new Dell computer that came with Ubuntu 7.04 to the pre-release version of Ubuntu 7.10 (Beta). Please read my initial review of this system.

After a large download and subsequent reboot, this computer came up in much better shape than it was in 7.04.

An Agnostic Objectively Reviews Ubuntu Christian Edition 3.3

I’ve been wanting to review Ubuntu Christian Edition (CE) 3.3 with intentions of giving it a good review. After all, it is Ubuntu, with a little Praise Jesus on the side. I enjoy using Ubuntu, and if someone can put some Jesus in an operating system and I like it, surely it’s an operating system that is worth using.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter - Issue 60

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #60 for the week September 30th - October 6th, 2007 is now available.. In this issue we cover the freeze of the Gutsy archive, a Gutsy countdown script for websites, Philipp Kern joining the MOTU Team, the release of UbuntuBolivia by the Bolivian LoCo Team, Ubuntu Forums interviews, and, as always, much much more!

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon and Linux on the Desktop

I’ve been using Ubuntu Feisty and waiting to get Gutsy when the release comes out. However my curiosity got the better of me and I could not resist upgrading from the beta repositories. The first thing I noticed after upgrade was the amount of polish and attention to detail. Everything looks slick (thanks to Compiz).

Behind MOTU: Travis Watkins

 Travis Watkins recently became a MOTU after a long time in the Ubuntu community. He is best known for Alacarte, the Gnome menu editor. He also wrote a Bayesian content filter called willow-ng for Edubuntu and more recently has been working on 3D desktop with the Compiz community.

Digital Photo Management In Linux, Part 1

Do you need a Macintosh computer for high-quality, satisfying digital photo management? Macs include the excellent iPhoto for no extra cost, and if you want to spend money the Aperture photo-management application is first-rate. Naturally, everyone asks "How do they compare to Adobe Photoshop?" The answer is they don't. They are strictly for managing and editing digital photos; they're not full-blown desktop publishing suites. So what does Linux offer for the ace digital photographer who doesn't want to splurge on a Mac? How about a few goodies like:

Uruguay poised to make first governmental OLPC purchase

Uruguay's government this week announced the results of a study indicating that XO computers from the One Laptop Per Child project were a better value for the nation's schoolchildren than Intel's similar offering, the Classmate PC. The next step is likely to be a purchase agreement between OLPC and Uruguay for at least 100,000 laptops. Though nothing has been finalized yet, when asked what needs to happen for formal agreement to occur, OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte simply says, "business closure."

Cacti With Xampp On Ubuntu

This is a simple setup of Cacti, so that you don’t really need a "Linux" expert to maintain it. Please note that Cacti can also be installed on Windows and guides for both these installations are available on the net. This guide is just a repeat of how Cacti was set up here in Mumbai.

What is Cacti? You can check out that here http://cacti.net. What is Cacti being used for?

Installing MonoDevelop from Source on Ubuntu

After reading a post from my friend Daniel about the new release of MonoDevelop, I decided to try and install it... which is when I realized that the installation from source is so painful I'd better figure it out and share it with everybody else.

Hpodder: a podcast client that just works.

So you’ve have been desperate for a podcast client that rivals the ease and efficiency of iTunes (but have found Linux clients wanting) then hpodder may be the answer to your quest. Having found other clients to be a little jack-of-all-trades for your needs or else, just plain buggy, hpodder is a breath of fresh air.

Continued Impressions of Kubuntu 7.10 beta

Well we’re into day two on using Kubuntu full-time and I’m getting most of my personal show stoppers worked out.  I want to thank everyone that left comments here giving me some suggestions.  Here are my continued thoughts on using it, and what I’ve worked out.

Automate FTP with macros

Has it been a while since you used FTP from the command line? While there are decent GUI-based FTP clients (such as gFTP), you can automate operations with the command-line version and handle file transfers with no user interaction at all.

Medibuntu: non-free-codecs for gutsy

The non-free codecs distributed by Medibuntu now come to a single metapackage: non-free-codecs. The proper package matching the architecture will be installed (please see the Launchpad bug report below).

Initial Impressions of Kubuntu 7.10 beta

As I mentioned a few days ago I have considered trying to use KDE again. Well yesterday I did a fresh install of Kubuntu 7.10 beta. Here are some of my initial thoughts:

Opera Tips & Tricks

As we’ve shown before, Opera is an extremely customizable browser, but it does so much that it can be difficult to remember it all. Then again you would have to know what it does in order to remember it.

Run your own home-entertainment server with Linux and MythTV: we show you how.

Once upon a time, people lived in caves and hunted animals with spears. Then, they recorded things from the TV onto small black cartridges filled with magnetic tape. Finally, in 1999, the Digital Video Recorder was born and civilization was discovered. I may have missed out some minor details, but that's the short version.

Compiz-Fusion On Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbin”

I’ve been playing around with Compiz-Fusion on my Macbook over the past week or so and realize it could make a good topic for a tutorial.  The problem is that it took me *zero* configuration to get it going.  While this is good and a great boost for Desktop users everywhere I don’t really have much to share with the wide-world on setting it up.

What I do have to share however are the key shortcuts and settings that I like to use.

It's so nice to see Ubuntu getting more mainstream

The New York Times had a review of Ubuntu today, and it was generally pretty positive. I've been using it for most of the year now, and at this point, I've almost forgotten that I'm not using the same OS as everyone else because it works so well. Not only are all the parts of the OS really great - Gnome, Open Office, Firefox, Thunderbird, Gimp and all the little apps like gEdit and the file manager - but the integration of these apps and general organization in Ubuntu is awesome as well. I find myself more and more productive using it every day as I unlearn old habits and learn new ones.

Richard Stallman Cowsay Hack for Ubuntu

In this howto/hack I provide instructions on how to create a real virtual Richard Stallman to use with the programs vrms and cowsay. vrms is a program that will scan your Ubuntu installation and tell you how many non-free packages you have installed. The hack provides an ASCII art image of RMS to use with cowsay to output your vrms results. And before you ask, yes it is totally pointless.

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