Enabling Hardware Temperature Sensors in Linux

From http://www.techthrob.com/tech/linuxsensors.php

Most computers these days come with a myriad of sensors to monitor the temperature of your computer. These sensors are generally located on the processor and the motherboard, and you might also have sensors on your video card. On top of that, all S.M.A.R.T-enabled hard drives have built-in temperature monitoring.

TrueCrypt With GUI On Ubuntu 7.10

This document describes how to set up TrueCrypt with GUI on Ubuntu 7.10. TrueCrypt is a free open-source encryption software for desktop usage.

Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG Game?

Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game) that’s extremely easy to install (yes, like in Microsoft Windows)?? I love this game!

Ubuntu Help: Reporting bugs using Launchpad

One of the reasons free operating systems are so great is because of their bug reporting features. Ubuntu is no exception. Like most other GNU/Linux operating systems, Ubuntu allows users to file bug reports using its bug reporting site, Launchpad. In the free software world, each user becomes a potential beta tester and gets the chance to contribute to the community without ever coding or writing documentation. Unfortunately, Launchpad’s bug reporting tool often scares away users who have no idea what a ticket, project, or distribution is.

An Ubuntu retrospective in wallpaper

A week ago, maybe a little longer, there was a thread on the forums asking for the wallpaper that came with Dapper, for someone who was running Gutsy (or something like that; I’ve lost the original thread). Each release usually has its own wallpaper, and the original poster preferred something that wasn’t on hand for the version he had.

Medibuntu : The Only 3rd Party Repo I Use

I am generally very wary of suggesting the use of 3rd party repositories. I rarely, if ever, use them myself, even if it’ll make installing an application a bit simpler. The bottom line for this is that I want my machine to be as supported as it can be, so I generally only use the official Ubuntu repositories (main restricted universe multiverse). Adding this repository will add unsupported packages to your system, but it is considered far more trusted than other repositories.

Recovering failed RAID disks on Linux

Disk failure, on the hardware side, is too broad to cover in any great detail here, but the following basic steps should be followed (of course, as noted, your setup may require otherwise). The scenario here is that one of your disks has just gone "bad." It's beyond recovery.

Fix the SSH “Remote Host Identification Has Changed” Error

Every SSH server uses a random key to identify itself. When SSH is installed a new key is generated. SSH clients keep track of the host key, if it changes the user can be warned that they might not be connecting to the computer they think they are. Most of the time this happens when the SSH server or the OS are reinstalled.

Open Aerial Map project is collecting free data

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) project is well on its way to producing a free, user-editable street-level vector map of the world. OpenAerialMap (OAM) is similar in scope, committed to building a free, bird's-eye photographic map of the world. But it faces a unique set of challenges.

Using mouse gestures across Linux

My first brush with mouse gestures on the Opera browser was an accident, but the ability to quickly move backward or forward in the browser history, open new windows, close tabs, and more without using the menus or moving the mouse toward the navigation toolbar won me over immediately. Nowadays, this feature is available in Firefox and Konqueror too, and you can even configure mouse gestures for GNOME and KDE desktop environments.

Eight Interesting Improvements In GNOME 2.22

Back in November we started sharing some of the exciting features planned for the GNOME 2.22 and 2.24 releases, and now that the first GNOME 2.22.0 Beta release is planned for later this week, we have taken another look at the packages set for inclusion and the changes that have actually been made. While nothing groundbreaking will be introduced in GNOME 2.22 (compared to KDE 4.0 at least), this desktop environment does have some moderate changes worth noting.

Indywiki: A visual browser for Wikipedia

While you can quickly find an article about a particular topic using Wikipedia's search capabilities, there are other ways to explore the online encyclopedia that break away from the traditional search box approach. With Indywiki, for instance, once you've found the article you're looking for, you can continue to browse related topics visually, because Indywiki processes the current and related articles and extracts images from them. When you click on an image, Indywiki displays the article that the picture links to.

Brightside - Screen Corner Actions and Edge-Flipping Made Easy

Brightside adds actions to the corners of the screen in GNOME, such as switching virtual desktops and controlling the volume. You can even enable the screensaver and control the screen brightness on your laptop.

The Essence of Choice

Over the years, I've had people ask me many times, "Why do you use this program or that program?  Why not use Microsoft instead like everyone else?"  I simply reply, "Because I prefer to have the power to choose what program I want to use, when, where, why, and without big brother corporation X breathing down my neck telling me what I can and can't do."  The responses to that have been quite interesting over the years. 

Fast Address book for your Desktop

gfa is a small and fast address book written in C and GTK+2. It uses sqlite as backend for the addresses.

CLI audio players for Linux

What would life be without music? Given the proper codecs, in Linux you can play almost any digital audio format. Linux has many graphical applications that can do the job, such as Amarok, Rhythmbox, Audacious, and XMMS, all of which provide an intuitive user interface, playlist sorting, and various other options. But what if you want low resource usage so you can play tunes on aging hardware? Here are some alternative players for the Linux command line.

Extinguish communication blues with OpenFire

Many companies consider instant messaging to be a distraction, but IM can be an effective communication tool if used properly. OpenFire is an open source enterprise IM server that has lots of features to streamline communication within an enterprise. The server is written in Java and uses Jabber, which is one of the most popular open protocols for real-time communication. In addition to being cross-platform, OpenFire is easy to set up and administer.

Installing the Slim Glow Plasma Theme in KDE 4.0

If you’re not a fan of the large borders on the default KDE 4.0 Plasma theme, you’re in luck. The first themes for Plasma are starting to appear. Here’s how to install the new Slim Glow theme in KDE 4.0:

How To Install and Run Ubuntu Linux Inside Windows

Have you ever wanted to actually try Ubuntu Linux (Live CD’s don’t count) without having to worry about partitioning or installing another hard drive or setting up a dual boot? This step by step guide will walk you through the exact steps to run Ubuntu totally inside of Windows utilizing a virtual machine.

Open Enterprise Interview: Jono Bacon

Ubuntu has rapidly established itself as the leading GNU/Linux distribution on the desktop, not least through its work with Dell. Less well-known is the fact that Canonical, the company sponsoring Ubuntu – and trying to create a viable business around it – is based in London. One of the key members of staff working there is Jono Bacon, Canonical's Ubuntu Community Manager.

MakeHuman - Open Source Human Modeler

Allow me to introduce the software that will change graphics on the Linux desktop forever. The Linux graphics toolkit has been missing one crucial tool: a way to quickly render human models, similar to the commercial, proprietary Poser. Well, we've got that now.

Yet Another Useful Feature in Ubuntu…Whois Search!

Yeah, you can perform an actual Whois Search for that domain name you’ve been wanting or to look up who owns that one whose site you’re browsing. All from your Ubuntu Desktop!

This can be a particularly good thing these days especially in light of the recent happenings with Network Solutions and their domain tasting stories like this one from Dave Zan in which he says:

IBM's Lotus Symphony Beta 3: A Review

Now that I have had a chance to install Lotus Symphony Beta 3 on my Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon (aka - version 7.10) installation and have run it for several days, I have decided that it is time for a review. For this review, I have decided to show how to get Symphony working on Ubuntu, as well as the major features found in the Beta 3 release.

How Linux Users Should React in a Windows World

Many Linux users find themselves working in Windows-based environments. More often that not, this is not something that can be avoided, and to be honest, I cannot actually say for certain that it should be. Despite the resistance from some Linux users to remain familiar with other operating systems, there is a certain level of importance in making sure that Windows does remain something that you are familiar with. And I say this for a number of reasons. Today, I will examine the advantages on all fronts as to being fluent with more than one OS.

Backing Up in Ubunu - FINALLY made Easy with TimeVault: An In-Depth Review with Screenshots

Backing up your data is critical. Hard drives fail, filesystems currupt, and in general, bad things just happen. But until now, there's been no easy way for most people to backup their data in Linux; most backups consisted of rsync tied to a cron job - far too complex for the average user.

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