wine

Running Google Chrome Under Wine 1.1.6 in Debian and Ubuntu

Google Chrome is an open-source web browser from Google, currently available only for the Windows platform. It aims to have a minimal and easy to use interface. Chrome uses the WebKit rendering engine, which was developed from KHTML, and it is used in various browsers like Konqueror on KDE4 or Safari (on Mac OS X).

Installing Office 2007 in Linux

People thougt that the recent version of microsoft office (2007) can't be ran in linux/ubuntu. But, I finally found some useful method after googling and some problem solve with it. There are actualy a lot of method to do to install office 2007. Check it out by yourself!

Install Google Chrome in Ubuntu with Wine

The Linux version of Google’s Chrome web browser is not ready yet. Don’t boot up Windows, if you’re interested in testing it out it’s possible to do so by running Chrome under Wine.

Run Google Chrome in Ubuntu with WINE

One helpful Ubuntu hacker blogger posts a guide to getting Google Chrome working as a stand-alone app in Ubuntu, using the latest version of the Windows translator WINE and a stand-alone copy of Chrome's installer.

Wine-Doors for Linux Reviewed

I have been using Wine (WINE) or various implementations of it (Crossover Office and Cedega) for a few years now. What is funny is that I often had more success with Wine proper than I did with the various offshoot products. Go figure! So when I learned this issue...

First 'stable' Wine puts Windows apps on Linux

The makers of Wine, a compatibility tool that allows Windows applications to run on Linux machines without Windows installed, have released a stable version of Wine 1.0. The makers of Wine claim that version 1.0 is the first such "stable" release and have said that although compatibility is not perfect, thousands of applications are reported to "work very well".

Finally, it's time for Wine

Fifteen years in the making, everyone's favorite software to run Windows programs on Linux and Unix, Wine, is almost ready for its 1.0 release.

Wine project announces first release candidate

The Wine project has announced the first release candidate for Wine, the free Windows API for Unix/Unix-like systems (and even non-unix systems like MS Windows itself and ReactOS). The Wine project started in 1993, which makes this release candidate 15 years in the making.

The Platinum Top 10 Wine Game List

Im not a big fan of wine games but I thought I would share the progress of the wine developers in getting these hot games to work with it. I am still hoping gaming developers create linux clients for these games, leave direct x and start using opengl... Here is the current top 10 platinum wine games.

Install (GTA) Grand Theft Auto Vice City with wine in Ubuntu Hardy Heron!

Did you know GTA Vice City works in wine? The other day I was bored... really bored... So I decided to download GTA and get it working in wine, and to my suprise it was too freakn simple. All I did was Download GTA Vice City apply no-cd-cracked.exe and started it up. Has anyone else had any great successes in getting hot games working in wine? Please let me know and let us all know how you got it to work. Here is how I got GTA Vice City working...

Wine: Improving Look And Feel

A lot of people complains about Wine looks. But not everyone realizes that one can make it look neat easily. This article preents a few simple tips to convert your default Wine to a special one.

Google behind Photoshop's new Linux compatibility

Google recently confirmed in a blog posting that it had paid Codeweavers to help develop WINE to make Photoshop usable on the well-regarded but still somewhat unpredictable software package, which aims to replicate Windows libraries to enable popular Windows applications run in a Linux environment.

Give Wine apps the look and feel of GNOME or KDE

Wine allows users to run Windows programs natively under Linux without paying a dime. However, there's a tiny problem: programs running in Wine don't look so great. They don't even try to fit into your native GNOME or KDE color scheme or use your preferred fonts. You could use a Windows theme, but themes make Wine run extremely slowly. Luckily, with a little configuration editing, it's easy to make Wine applications look at lot more like the rest of the apps on your desktop.

Stop Beating Your Wine Apps With The Ugly Stick

Applications running with Wine don’t have to look so appalling! Ubuntu 8.04 is planned to have usability improvements for Wine, among these improvements is a theme for Wine applications that matches the GTK theme. Can’t wait until April?

Miss Your Windows Application? Try WINE

For anyone who is keen to migrate to Linux platform, but can’t live without Windows application, then Wine can be a great solution for you.

DirectX 9.0c on Linux with Wine

Microsoft DirectX is a collection of application programming interfaces for handling tasks related to multimedia, especially game programming and video, on Microsoft platforms.

Linux and Windows: virtualize, Wine or dual boot route?

As I've mentioned in previous articles I currently have all the applications I need on my Ubuntu Linux desktop so I never need to use Windows. However, there are unfortunately still plenty of applications that some users need which are not available under Linux and have no equivalent. Adobe's Flash and Photoshop spring to mind, Turbotax is another that some miss, how about iTunes? Luckily for those users there are at least three options that will allow them to run the software they need while retaining Linux on their desktop. But which is the best one?

Getting Up and Going with Wine on Ubuntu

Wine is a free compatibility layer that allows some Windows programs to be used under Linux and other Unices. It is not perfect, but may work out of the box for some of those applications you need. As was revealed in the 2007 Desktop Linux survey at DesktopLinux.com, the majority of Linux users who run Windows programs on Linux use Wine. However, seeing as the default interface is primarily a CLI, it can be confusing to use to new Ubuntu users to use. Here we will simply install Wine and install K-Meleon 1.1 as an example.

Wine

Lots of Linux users already know about Wine. So do I, and I’ve known about it for a long time. For the ones of you who don’t know, Wine is a compatibility layer for Unix-like operating systems (Wine is Not an Emulator), designed to run applications built for Windows in said Unix-like operating system.

Ubuntu 7.10 + WINE vs. Windows XP

This week's release of Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" is a significant win for the free software community. Not only does this release incorporate an updated package set -- most notably with the Linux 2.6.22 kernel and GNOME 2.20, but it also delivers on new desktop innovations from BulletProofX and displayconfig-gtk to Compiz Fusion being enabled by default on supported systems.

However, for those business professionals and gamers that remain dependent on some Windows-only binary applications, the WINE (WINE Is Not An Emulator) project has been making some excellent headway into supporting Windows applications on the Linux desktop. With Ubuntu 7.10 and WINE 0.9.46 in hand, we had set out to compare the performance between Windows XP and Gutsy Gibbon with WINE on two popular DirectX benchmarks.

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