windows

How To Do Seamless Window and Folder Integration with Ubuntu & VirtualBox

I’m going to outline today how to setup seamless window integration with Ubuntu and Virtualbox. If you missed yesterday’s post you might want to take a look at the seamless integration screenshot. No, that is not Photoshop’d, its really my desktop. I’ll also outline how to setup a shared folder between the two systems so that the icons and folders available on your XP desktop are available on your Ubuntu dekstop. So lets go ahead and dive in.

SSH101: Secure Shell Basics and X11 Forwarding

From Techthrob.com:

SSH is an incredibly powerful tool. It lets you connect to a computer anywhere in the world, share files, and even run applications remotely. This tutorial will take you through installing and configuring the SSH Server, discuss some of the basic options of the SSH client, and even show you how to run graphical applications on a remote computer, from anywhere.

Read More at Techthrob.com

How To Install and Run Ubuntu Linux Inside Windows

Have you ever wanted to actually try Ubuntu Linux (Live CD’s don’t count) without having to worry about partitioning or installing another hard drive or setting up a dual boot? This step by step guide will walk you through the exact steps to run Ubuntu totally inside of Windows utilizing a virtual machine.

How to fix your Windows MBR with an Ubuntu liveCD

Something happen to a windows Master Boot Record (MBR) that you’re responsible for? Want a very quick, very easy way to restore it with nothing but your craft, native intelligence and a liveCD?

Single User Profile for Linux and Windows

By far the best and most fluid feature of Ubuntu 7.10 is the ability to read and write to NTFS drives. What does that mean?  It means that you can share resources and use both drives as one!  You can share documents and settings between windows seamlessly.  You have one bookmarks file, one addressbook, one Documents directory.  Here’s how to set it up.

Howto Boot After a Failed Linux Install

Installing Ubuntu [and most other Linux distros] isn't too difficult. In fact with the latest liveCD installs it has become easier than ever before. However, it is still possible for the installation process will go wrong and fail. This has happened to me on a couple of occasions and it has left me with a system that is incapable of booting.

The first time this happened there was a power outage mid-installation. On the second occasion the installation shut down after finding a hardware fault [the heatsink had pinged off my coprocessor!] Read about how I fixed my system here.

Samba Project to provide Windows protocol access to all open source developers

Thanks to the Samba project, documentation about Windows networking protocols is now available to free software developers who want it. With the help of the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) and the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), Samba has hammered out an agreement for obtaining the documentation and has set up the new Protocol Freedom Information Foundation (PFIF) to make it accessible to other free software projects.

Vista to Ubuntu (100%)

I had enough with eating crap with Vista. My last line of patience warned off when I happened to wait about 5 seconds when changing from one MS Doc file to another and also happened that I was running with time to finish a project report.

Read Your Linux Partition from Windows with DiskInternals Linux Reader

Back in the summer I wrote about two programs that allow Windows to read and write to Ext3 partitions as if they were native filesystems. DiskInternals Linux Reader is a similar program for read-only access.

Ubuntu Linux vs Windows Vista: The Desktop Battle

It may be a brave opinion but I predict that Ubuntu Linux and Windows Vista are going to be the two operating systems that will take over the largest chunk of the desktop OS market during the next couple of years. This comparison is based on my experience with both systems during the last couple of weeks on two different computers.

Running IE On Linux -- And Running Windows XP For Free (Sort Of)

Yes, I know the headline sounds like the fodder for a joke: "Run IE on Linux? Why would you want to?" But there are circumstances where it's unavoidable -- compatibility testing, or accessing IE-only sites without dual-booting -- and in the last few weeks I've come across a couple of interesting approaches to this issue.

Linux and Windows: virtualize, Wine or dual boot route?

As I've mentioned in previous articles I currently have all the applications I need on my Ubuntu Linux desktop so I never need to use Windows. However, there are unfortunately still plenty of applications that some users need which are not available under Linux and have no equivalent. Adobe's Flash and Photoshop spring to mind, Turbotax is another that some miss, how about iTunes? Luckily for those users there are at least three options that will allow them to run the software they need while retaining Linux on their desktop. But which is the best one?

CyberNotes: Share a Firefox Profile Between Ubuntu and Windows

One of the new things in Ubuntu 7.10 is the ability to read and write to NTFS formatted drives, which is great for Windows XP and Vista users. What that means is that you can create a Firefox profile in Windows and set it up so that Ubuntu uses the exact same profile.

Ubuntu 7.10 + WINE vs. Windows XP

This week's release of Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" is a significant win for the free software community. Not only does this release incorporate an updated package set -- most notably with the Linux 2.6.22 kernel and GNOME 2.20, but it also delivers on new desktop innovations from BulletProofX and displayconfig-gtk to Compiz Fusion being enabled by default on supported systems.

However, for those business professionals and gamers that remain dependent on some Windows-only binary applications, the WINE (WINE Is Not An Emulator) project has been making some excellent headway into supporting Windows applications on the Linux desktop. With Ubuntu 7.10 and WINE 0.9.46 in hand, we had set out to compare the performance between Windows XP and Gutsy Gibbon with WINE on two popular DirectX benchmarks.

Guide: Switching To Ubuntu - From Windows

If you are considering trying Ubuntu, or if you have already made up your mind to switch, welcome! This page is here to make the process as comfortable as possible. It describes differences in behavior between the two systems. When you decide to switch, Transferring Files and Settings shows how to transfer your data.

Linux vs. Windows Power Usage

Since publishing our Ubuntu power tests, where we had monitored the power consumption of the past six Ubuntu releases going back two years on a laptop, we've had repeated requests for a power comparison between Windows and different Linux distributions. Well, in this article are the first set of results from that testing. We've compared the power consumption of Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, Fedora 7, and Ubuntu 7.10.

Ubuntu Linux, Windows Vista or Mac OSX?

My wife needed a new laptop and, as her birthday was a couple of months away, I began to research what I would get for her. I generally make the technology purchases for our household so I started looking at how she used her current laptop and what would be useful to her. Well, it arrived yesterday and, before I tell you what it is, I’ll tell you how I came to that conclusion.

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux.

Windows Guy Tries Ubuntu 7.04

I’m Live Blogging my first attempt at the newest version of Ubuntu , version 7.04. Let me get this out of the way first - I am a hard-core Windows fan. Say what you want about Microsoft, it powers the world. I can use any hardware, play any game and use nearly any software ever written. I can do it securely, and with little frustration. Every attempt I have ever made at using Linux has left me disappointed. I am a geek, but I do not relish spending 3 days to get a wireless card working when I can do it in 5 minutes in Windows. There, is that enough of a disclaimer? OK then here we go.

Install Ubuntu as a Windows program (Wubi)

Wubi is a free Windows front end installer for the Ubuntu operating system. That means that Wubi allows you to install Ubuntu without leaving Windows, just like any other Windows application! With Wubi you don’t have to burn any fancy I.S.O. images to a CD, no worrying about disk partitioning, and you can even uninstall Ubuntu, right from windows.

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