video

Play video inside .rar files in Ubuntu (without extracting the archives)

There are two methods one can use to play video inside .rar files in Ubuntu (without extracting the archives).

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SMPlayer Review - One of the Most Powerful Video Players for Linux

SMPlayer is a complete video player built in Qt 4.4.0 and based on the powerful, open-source MPlayer.

The version I decided to test in this review is 0.6.1 from SVN. SMPlayer basically plays anything video or audio, including DVDs, VCDs or DVD ISO images, audio CDs, MPEG, AVI or ASF. You can also play mounted images of DVDs by pointing to the directory which contains the VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS directories. It can also play videos from a given URL location.

11 Popular Video Players for Linux - Review

SMPlayer
SMPlayer is a fully featured video player built using the Qt 4 libraries. It basically plays anything, including DVDs and ISO images, but it skipped the menus when reading DVD ISOs. It's complete and it offers plenty configuration options, including for subtitles and the interface itself, allowing to choose the icon set and the style used. You can also configure the language SMPlayer uses for its interface, including English, Romanian, Polish, German and many other. I was impressed to see translations are pretty much complete.

Play a DVD video ISO image

I have this new video camera Sony that records on mini DVDs, and I got a video from my daughter dancing for the mother's day, I copied it as an image to the hard disk of my Linux Operating System machine:

Transform images into videos with images2mpg

images2mpg, a simple utility that's part of the KDE Image Plugin Interface (KIPI), lets you create an MPEG file from image files. Relying on a handful of command-line tools including the ImageMagick suite and mjpegtools, images2mpg creates wonderful videos from your images and even lets you insert your favorite song as the background. It supports SVCD, DVD, VCD, and XVCD video formats.

Easily Convert Videos with WinFF and FFmpeg

WinFF is a easy to use graphical interface to the command line FFmpeg video and audio tool. WinFF makes it easy to encode many videos to a wide range of formats all at once. Its FFmpeg back-end should handle just about any video you have.

Top 3 Video Aggregators for Linux Reviewed

As we discussed earlier in our RSS reader options for Linux article, this platform also has its fair share of solutions for those of us who are looking to subscribe to podcasts as well.

Fix for Video Playback Problem in Compiz-Fusion

While running Compiz-Fusion, You wouldn’t be able to see any video play while either moving the window, viewing desktops in expo, 3d cube, or any other cool effect for that matter; instead you would see a blue screen, including when viewing in full screen.

Loop Movie, Video, and Display Screensaver as Desktop Wallpaper in Ubuntu

Want to loop a video clip or movie on your desktop? I did and found a nice little tool that does just that. First lets grab some essential building libraries via the terminal: Applications->Accessories->Terminal:

Encode Video for the iPod Touch or iPhone

Now that you have your iPhone or iPod Touch syncing in Linux, how about putting some video on it? These iPods are picky about video formats, but the excellent Avidemux video tool can encode your videos to be compatible.

Open source video editing: what we have now and what we need

Watching the evolution of open source tools for video editing and manipulation over the last 10 years has been less than a thrilling experience. But are things about to change for the better in the near future? Can even the people most disenchanted with the current state of affairs feel tempted to regain a spark of hope?

Play YouTube Videos from the Totem Movie Player

GNOME’s Totem Movie Player now includes a plugin for searching and playing YouTube videos without leaving the player, and without Flash. It’s installed by default in Ubuntu 8.04, and works fabulously!

Video Collection Managers

I was looking for something to help me manage my movies collection. Ubuntu comes with many collection manager applications. In this post I will talk about three of them.

Ubuntu Linux Video Tutorial: Embedded Terminal into the Desktop

Subtitles, Video Editing and DVD Authoring in Ubuntu

Translating movie subtitles is my new hobby. I had no previous knowledge of what subtitles are, how they are embedded in a DVD movie, how to rip them off, how to create new subtitles, and then finally how to prepare a DVD with translated subtitles that could be played on most popular software, hardware and standalone DVD players. I found out that it was not an easy job to embed UTF-8 encoded text on DVD as a separate subtitle stream. So I decided to hardsub my movie, which means that users will not have the option to turn off the Urdu subtitles.

Very simple video editing/DVD burning in Ubuntu

You have a IEEE1394 (Firewire) camera and you want to burn your birthday/wedding/funerals on a DVD. And maybe cut the scene where you look silly, dancing madly with a potato in your pants. It's Ok, Ubuntu can save your reputation...

Fix Dark Video Playback

For a while I had been noticing that video playback in both Totem and VLC was too dark. Using VLC I could manually adjust the brightness to watch videos normally. Today, I found how to fix the problem.

Cinelerra community forks the video editor

The community surrounding Cinelerra, one of the premier non-linear video editors for Linux, has decided to strike off in its own direction and rewrite Cinelerra under a new codebase.

PyTube: Download and Convert YouTube Videos to Various Formats

If you needed to convert a YouTube video to, say, 3gp format for your mobile phone a few months back, you would probably have to use several applications ran with impossible to remember options. First, you would have to get the video in .flv format using youtube-dl and convert it to avi, mp4, 3gp and so on with a huge command like ffmpeg -i a1Y73sPHKxw.flv -ab 48 -ar 32010 -b 700 -s 320×240 -vcodec xvid -acodec mp3 video.avi (don’t use it). But fortunately, times change, things evolve and new awesome applications hit the Linux streets (not all the time but still..).

Editing HD Video in Linux

AVCHD capable cameras are fast becoming the most popular way to record your video — the size to quality ratio is leaps and bounds above other formats. Unfortunately video editing software hasn't necessarily caught up with the latest trend in cameras, which can make editing your AVCHD videos something of pain.

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