player

Minitube Native YouTube Client For Linux And Doesn't Require Flash Player

Minitube is a native YouTube client for Linux and Mac OS X. The really useful part about Minitube is that it does not require Flash Player.

mpd - the Music Player Daemon

There are dozens of nice music players around, that’s for sure. You can choose between featur rich killer applications like Rhythmbox or Amarok, use old-school but up to date standards like XMMS or even a console classic like mp3blaster. Most of the standard players have in common, that the interface and the player itself are the same. That’s normal and therefore everything is fine. But maybe you are in a situation where you prefer playing music on a remote machine, only have a console or just don’t want your music player to stay open while playing. Huh?

Gnome Music Player Showdown

I’ve been reading a lot of reviews recently about the upcoming Banshee 1.0.  (Arstechnica and Linux Magazine, for example)  It looks like it’s going to be an awesome release, but I wanted to see where it is now and compare that to Rhythmbox.

12 of the Best Media Players for Linux

One of the many perks of being a Linux user is that you have plenty of excellent software to choose from. This is especially true if you are in search for an essential application like a media player because there are definitely loads of options. However, this could sometimes be a disadvantage particularly to new-to-Linux users for the reason that they could get overwhelmed with the many choices they have.

Ubuntu Media Players OverView

1. Beep Media Player: MP, or Beep Media Player, is a compact media player that was originally forked from XMMS with the goal of porting XMMS to GTK2 and make use of more modern desktop standards. The original XMMS is based on GTK 1.2, which is now deprecated for roughly 4 years, and was deprecated at the time of the fork for approximately 2 years. This, and the fact that the developers were developing XMMS under a mostly cathedral-style model led M. Derezynski to fork BMP from XMMS.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 6

Welcome to part 6 of our series. Today we'll be bringing you Rythmbox, Songbird, Totem and one of our previously missed media players, Aqualung. Now, on a subject of interest to our readers, I'd like to address a question that was thrown at me not too long back as to why I only cover four media players at a time.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 5

Welcome to part 5 of our Linux Media Player Roundup! Today we'll be going over several more media players for you to consider. But first, I wanted to let everyone know that I've done a little cleanup on part 1 of this article series.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 4

Welcome to part 4 of our media player roundup. Today we'll be covering a couple of interesting players that most older Linux users may remember, and most new users may not even know exists. We'll also be covering players that don't typically fit what would be considered the norm for a media player, but which provide you with quite a wide range of possible applications for daily use.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 3

Welcome to part 3 of our Linux Media Player Roundup. Today we'll be covering even more media players that are available for Linux, and even touching on a couple that do more than just play music, they also play your movies and dvd's.

Exaile: The most underrated media player for Linux

After actually trying out Songbird, I have a lot more respect for it, and amaroK has always been an excellent audio player, but my favorite media-management program for Linux is still Exaile.

Decibel Audio Player: An Audio Player for Human Beings

Aren’t you tired of those audio players with billions of useless features that clutter up their graphical interface? I am. Most of the time, the player looks good on paper, but when I’m faced with the interface, I don’t even know where to start in order to play my music. There are a lot of buttons, lists, combo boxes a bit everywhere and their usage is not so intuitive.

Support the Miro media player project, buy a T-shirt

The Participatory Culture Foundation (PCF) believes the media is controlled by a small group of corporations. In response, it created the open source video player Miro as a way to make media available to the masses.

Miro (Democracy Player) for Linux Reviewed

I have watched Miro (formally known as Democracy Player) grow and mature over the last few years, and I have to admit, it's become quite the addition to my Linux desktop. But how are the users reacting to the name change, and are they offering the content that users are into? Today, we will examine this and explore how Miro could go even further. I would point out that this is not so much a review, but a deeper look at the product and the mission as open source software.

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