record

3 Ways to Record Your Linux Desktop

In this article I'll include three ways to screencast your Linux desktop with the help of recordMyDesktop, XVidCap and Istanbul. These three applications are included in every major distribution.

Keystrokes Logger

Freeware keyboard logging application saves each typed keys, characters, digits and special character keys including tab, alt, shift, ctrl in confidential encrypted hidden log file.

Recording Skype calls in Linux

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I use Skype quite a bit. Not only to call family, friends, and clients, but also to record interviews and the occasional podcast. The recording part I had to do under Windows. While I’ve found quite a bit of advice on recording Skype calls in Linux, none of the solutions has ever worked for me.

Recording sounds for Impress slides with eVoice

Over the last few years, OpenOffice.org has started to develop a respectable number of extensions, mostly for Writer and Calc, the two most widely used applications. The OpenOffice.org Extensions site lists only a handful that are unique to Impress. The recently released eVoice, which records sounds for direct insertion into a slide, is one of them. Once configured, eVoice is straightforward to learn, and becomes even more useful when you're working with other Impress features.

Screen Recording With RecordMyDesk

As its name implies, RecordMyDesktop is a software that enables you to record activities on your desktop. It is simple, easy to use and produces high quality recording. It allows you to make video of your desktop, with or without sound in the open source .ogg format. The default RecordMyDesktop package is a terminal application without any graphical interface. Installing the gtk-reordmydesktop package provides the graphical frontend.

Record Your Screen With XVidCap

If you want to record your screen in Linux, XVidCap is the best solution. It’s easy to install, able to capture fast without dropping frames, and offers lots of options.

Listening to and recording audio and video streams with MPlayer

Most streaming audio and video on the Internet is disseminated in proprietary formats such as RM, RAM, WMV, and ASF. Fortunately, the open source application MPlayer can play and even record streams in almost any format.

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