process

How to Change Processes Priority In Linux

Linux starts many processes with priority 0, which is the highest priority (as the rule of thumb is that the lower the number, the greater the priority). If you are running any resource hungry application then this priority mechanism causes some problems.

Batch process photos with Phatch

Virtually any photo manager lets you perform mundane tasks like adjusting contrast, adding a watermark, and applying effects to your photos. But even powerful applications like digiKam and F-Spot can't really help you when you need to perform the same action (or a sequence of actions) on dozens or hundreds of photos. For that you need a batch processing utility like Phatch. This nifty tool can perform no fewer than 35 different actions on your photos, and its user-friendly graphical interface makes it easy to create advanced multistep batch rules.

Htop - Manage Your System Processes in Seconds

Htop is a process manager that builds on the functionality of top. It allows you to view available memory and CPU usage as well as kill and manage running processes. It integrates quite well into the system manager Conky.

Using Terminal to Shutdown Processes

XFCE does not come with a system monitor utility like the one I had in Gnome. I used the utility to kill unresponsive processes. So how do we kill unresponsive programs using the terminal?

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