management

Web Based Project Management With Collabtive On Ubuntu 7.10 Server

Project management is becoming an increasingly important part of the Sys Admin's life. While Microsoft Project seems to be the standard project management tool used in most environments that I have worked in, it can sometimes be nice to have such tools web based so that multiple users can share information. This is where tools such as Collabtive come in.  Collabtive is a web based project management tool that supports everything that you need to plan out and complete your projects.

Power Management on Linux, Part 2

In part 1 of this series we learned how to measure how much power our systems are using, both hardware and software, and some tricks for reducing power usage without degrading performance. Today we're going to dive into the world of power management on laptops: ACPI, APM, hard disk spindowns, and spinups.

Application/Software management in Ubuntu Gutsy

If you are very new to Ubuntu and have come from Windows where you got most updates by visiting the various vendors of each application and doing so separately; you are in for a shock! Updating your complete Ubuntu system including all the software is as simple as running the update manager. In this simple how-to you will learn how easy it is to install in various different ways and remove software as well.

Money management software review: Moneydance

In the last two weeks we looked at the two heavy hitters of the personal finance software world, Microsoft Money and Quicken. This week we look at a lesser known but equally attractive option, Moneydance. If you followed our last two articles you will have seen that while Microsoft Money and Quicken are powerful applications, the UK versions of both haven't been updated in a few years. So we decided to dig a little deeper to see if we could come up with an alternative.

Manage documents and bibliographies with Referencer

With Referencer, you can manage your collection of documents and a variety of reference files. In addition, you can also generate a BibTeX file through Referencer. Referencer is available for GNOME desktop environment.

Using Ubuntu as an Electronic Document Management System

Over the weekend a client phoned me as she was interested in the Knowledge Tree Document Management System. She runs a small business that provides document creation services for clients in the US and Canada, and needed an effective solution to manage her (electronic) documents. She also emailed this URL: http://www.knowledgetree.com/

Quick and easy photo management with F-Spot

Photo management software for Windows makes us weep. For most people, photo management consists of loading the software (and drivers) that came from the camera manufacturer. So you've got a Nikon camera, and the photo management software is really different from your significant other's Kodak software.

Digital Music Management with Linux (revisited)

A while ago I blogged about the long process of managing my music on my laptop (opensuse 10.3 with KDE). I’ve been able to trim it down a bit so I thought I’d post my findings in the hope that someone else saves some time and effort. My requirements are simple:

DAM Server

A DAM Server is a Digital Asset Management Server. In its purest form it is a central repository for your digital assets. This article will describe a Digital Image Asset Management Server and how to setup the Open Source alternative called Resourcespace.

Font Management In Linux, Part 2

Last week we learned some useful tips about font management in Linux. Today we're going to learn a few more ways to preview fonts, how to view font character maps, how to manage console fonts, and how to design your own fonts.

Digital Photo Management In Linux, Part 1

Do you need a Macintosh computer for high-quality, satisfying digital photo management? Macs include the excellent iPhoto for no extra cost, and if you want to spend money the Aperture photo-management application is first-rate. Naturally, everyone asks "How do they compare to Adobe Photoshop?" The answer is they don't. They are strictly for managing and editing digital photos; they're not full-blown desktop publishing suites. So what does Linux offer for the ace digital photographer who doesn't want to splurge on a Mac? How about a few goodies like:

Automated user management with Expect

At the large school in Mexico where I'm employed as a system manager, I proposed (and got) a Linux server to replace an old Windows 2000 file server and domain controller for the alumni. I then was faced with the task of adding 3,000 users to this new CentOS 5 server. I wasn't about to add thousands of users and their passwords one by one to the new Samba primary domain controller (PDC) system. With a little help from OpenOffice.org Calc, a utility called Expect, and shell scripts, I automated the process.

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