kernel

How To Install Ubuntu 12.04 On Non-PAE Capable Hardware

Ubuntu 12.04 (as well as Kubuntu 12.04) uses the PAE Linux kernel by default for 32bit ISOs so old computers that don't support PAE can't boot the latest Ubuntu version. But there is a way to install Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Precise Pangolin on computers without PAE support: using the non-PAE netboot Minimal ISO (there are also some alternatives, see below).

Linux Kernel Power Issue Fix

As you probably already know, the Linux Kernel has a pretty significant power issue starting with version 2.6.38 which hasn't been fixed yet (this includes version 3.0.0). This bug causes power consumption to go up by nearly 30% (and hence a shorter battery life) as reported by Phoronix which is pretty bad for netbook / laptop users.

How To Compile The Kernel In Ubuntu, The Easy Way [Video]

So you want to compile and maybe even apply a patch to the kernel but you've always thought that's too difficult?

Alternative To The "200 Lines Kernel Patch That Does Wonders" Which You Can Use Right Away

Phoronix recently published an article regarding a ~200 lines Linux Kernel patch that improves responsiveness under system strain. Well, Lennart Poettering, a RedHat developer replied to Linus Torvalds on a maling list with an alternative to this patch that does the same thing yet all you have to do is run 2 commands and paste 4 lines in your ~/.bashrc file.

Install Kernel Updates Without Rebooting With Ksplice Uptrack, Now Available For Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

With the release of Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat, Ksplice Uptrack - the rebootless update capability - will yet again be offered free of charge for Ubuntu Desktop 10.10.

KernelCheck Fixed .Deb Download [Ubuntu / Debian]

 

kernelcheck ubuntu

 

Remove Unused Linux Kernel Headers, Images And Modules With One Command

If you've installed Ubuntu Karmic since it's Beta like me, you probably have a lot of unused Linux Kernel headers, images and modules. Actually, even if you did a fresh install of the final version, you should have a few of those which you no longer use.

Download A Working KernelCheck .DEB File

KernelCheck is a a program that automatically compiles and installs the latest Kernel for Debian based Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.).

A reminder with KernelCheck features and what it can be used for:

KernelCheck Features

Patch KernelCheck To Make It Work Again [Ubuntu/Debian]

KernelCheck is a a program that automatically compiles and installs the latest Kernel for Debian based Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.). The program also allows for automatic installation of proprietary video drivers via EnvyNG.

Program Which Automatically Compiles and Install The Latest Kernel in Ubuntu / Debian: KernelCheck

KernelCheck is a a program that automatically compiles and installs the latest Kernel for Debian based Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.). The program also allows for automatic installation of proprietary video drivers via EnvyNG.

 

Linux Unified Kernel Reaches Version 0.2.4

Linux Unified Kernel which I was telling you about a few days ago was recently recently reached version 0.2.4.

Linux Unified Kernel Claims to Allow You To Run Windows Applications Just Like Running a Linux Program

Linux Unified Kernel claims to allow you to run Windows application native under Linux (I haven't tested it yet though).

So What Is The Linux Kernel?

While we hear so much about Linux and the Linux Kernel, what exactly is the Kernel and what does it do? In summary the Linux Kernel is the interface between the operating system and your computer hardware. It is the core of any computer allowing the operating system to control a number of different functions and is the most vital part of any operating system - without which your computer would not operate.

Remove Ubuntu Kernels You Don’t Need

Every time Ubuntu installs a new Linux kernel, the old one is left behind. This means that if you are regularly updating an Ubuntu system the Grub boot menu becomes longer and longer with kernels you don’t need anymore.

An Ubuntu guide to taming the Linux kernel

Although Linux is frequently referred to by the names of various distributions, what can properly be called “Linux” is really the management part of the operating system known as the kernel which interacts with the computer’s hardware. Here’s how the kernel works in Ubuntu, and how to rebuild it.

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