gedit

20 Text Editors for Linux [Overview & Screenshots]

First of all, I’d like to point out this article doesn’t include full-fledged IDEs, I’ll leave those for another article. So in conclusion you won’t find here Emacs, nor Vim or Eclipse and so on.

TextMap Gedit Plugin Displays A Navigable File Thumbnail In The Side Pane

If you like the minimap which shows you an an overview of your files that comes with Sublime Text 2, you'll be glad to know that such a plugin was released for Gedit.

 

The plugin is called Text Map and displays a navigable thumbnail of the entire file in the side pane

Gedit Plugin To Search And Replace In Multiple Files

Advanced Find / Replace is a plugin for Gedit for easily search and replace in multiple documents. It currently works with all opened documents and all the files in a directory you select.

Gedit plugins for everyone

If you drift between distributions, one of the first things you might notice is that Gedit, GNOME's text editor, is not always the same on each system. For instance, in Debian, Gedit is a relatively simple text edit, while in Ubuntu, it sprouts features that Debian users may never have seen. The difference is the plugins that each distribution packages with Gedit and enables by default. Many of these plugins make only small alterations by themselves, but enable a dozen or more and you'll find Gedit transformed almost out of recognition, regardless of whether you are using it to write code or plain text.

Extending the Gedit Text Editor with Plugins

GNOME’s default text editor, Gedit, includes a powerful plugin system similar to Firefox’s. There are useful plugins available for both programmers and regular users.

Praise for the Humble gedit

I’ve been a fan of lightweight text editors for more than 10 years now. I started out on Emacs, drifted over to Vi(m) for a long stretch and then somehow settled into Textmate for the last couple of years. This week, since I’ve been bouncing from OS to OS, I’m checking in with a number of text editors that I’ve either never used or haven’t visited in a long time. Having been a KDE guy back in the day, gedit falls under the former category.

gedit plugins: What they are and how to use them

In my last article, I talked about using the powerful gedit text editor. But no program is perfect, mainly because too many features imply too much bloat. That’s where gedit’s plugins come into play. In this article, I’m will explain how to install and use some of my favorite gedit plugins.

gedit: a powerful, underrated text editor for everybody

Most computer users spend their entire life looking for the Holy Grail. In other words, they spend all their life searching for the perfect editor that supports all their languages, is free as in speech, has spelling, has highlighting… you get the picture. Obviously, there isn’t a perfect editor out there. However, some come pretty close. Ironically, one of them is one that any Ubuntu (or in fact, any Gnome) user has installed, though they may not know it. It’s called gedit (also known as Text Editor).

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