find

Tutorial: Using the 'find' Command

GNU find is a powerful command-line utility that lets you search for files and folders in a hierarchical tree directory structure. It is the backend for all those utilities out there like the graphical searching in KDE or GNOME. However, find can be a little hard to handle at first by beginners.

How to find biggest files in Linux - Free disk space

When you are running out of disk space, you need to concentrate on the biggest files and folders on your disk, so you can get space quickly.

The best way, is to list the first 10 folders, then go inside some of them, and find files you may or can delete, and get new free space.

4 Shell Tools For Find Files In Linux

1. locate

How to use:

locate file_name

Example:

locate xorg.conf

Will return this:

/etc/X11/xorg.conf
/usr/share/man/man5/xorg.conf.5.gz
/var/lib/x11/xorg.conf.md5sum

GNOME Debian Package Finder: Rough and ready package search for the desktop

If you do your Debian package management from the command line, you are probably aware of utilities that search the cache of available programs, such as apt-cache, apt-file, and dpkg. Possibly, too, you have cursed the limited search information available in graphical interfaces like Synaptic, which does not extend much beyond searching for the description, name, versions, and dependencies. Now, the GNOME Debian Package Finder (gpfind) is in the process of bring much of the command-line search capacity to the desktop -- although, at version 0.1.6, it is still too rough to replace its command-line equivalents for most users.

rpl - A Find & Replace Terminal Tool

Tonight I have mainly been working on Whird. I have been rewriting large chunks of code in an effort to optimise a bunch of functions. As a result of this, I had to change a series of strings in a number of files. As per normal when it comes to fiddly grep, sed and awk commands, I fired up Google and searched for some pointers. Whilst refreshing my memory, I came across a comment by an anonymous reader who suggested using the rpl command.

6 ways to find files in linux

1. Kfind : Sometimes you need to find a file so that you can edit it, but you do not know exactly where it is located in the files system. you might know the name of the file or only part of the name. At another time you might need a list of all files that have been modified in the last two days or that exceeds a certain size.You can use Kfind to find files with specific features, you can start Kfind from the KDE menu with the find files entry.

Flipping the Linux switch: Misplace a file? Find it quick!

It happens to the best of us. We forget where we put things. Car keys. Flash drives. Yes, sometimes we even forget where certain files are on our computers. We can't really help you with the car keys and flash drives (although we inexplicably find things like that in the refrigerator here), we can help you out with finding missing files.

Find the items you want with GNOME Do

The wealth of applications on a modern Linux system is phenomenal, but sifting through screen after screen of menu items is no fun. Likewise, it's convenient to have all of your files in one place, but the more you have the longer you have to look for the one you need.

How-To: Find files on your computer with find

A standard Linux system has an incredible amount of files installed. Looking for a file location can be a painful task to do though a file browser. Fortunately, there is a nifty command line available by default on any Linux distribution: find.

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