collection

Media collection software in GNU/Linux

Around three years ago, when I began my adventure with ‘the penguin’, I had been looking for an application to catalog CDs. They were either ugly, or limited in functionality, or simply couldn’t handle all disk types (e.g. DVD)… some other apps were required for installation, and/or involved many “weird” libraries (which I didn’t know what to do about). I quickly gave up my research, realizing that nothing could match software like WhereIsIt?.

Video Collection Managers

I was looking for something to help me manage my movies collection. Ubuntu comes with many collection manager applications. In this post I will talk about three of them.

Track your collections with Tellico

Is there anyone who doesn't collect something? I, for instance, have a sizable collection of books. Remembering who gave me which ones, and keeping track of ones I've currently lent to friends, is a nightmarish chore. Happily, the Tellico collection manager can catalog all sorts of collections, including books, movies, games, cards, coins, comic books, and even wine.

Media collection managers for Linux

There comes a time, right after you burn your 137th MP3 CD, when you start feeling the need to establish a system for finding all the songs you treasure so much. It's the same with movies, application kits, books, and music -- you need software that lets you index your media quickly and output detailed search results. Here's a selection of Linux applications you can use to ease your work.

Manage your Movie Collection with Griffith

From Techthrob.com:

Griffith is an application for the Gnome desktop that organizes your movie collection, much in the same way Alexandria is used to organize your book library. Simply by entering the name of a movie, Griffith will query various databases on the internet and download cover art, plot details, and cast information.

Preserving browser tab collections with Session Manager

Firefox includes an option for bookmarking all open tabs, but heavy users of tabs will find that this option is hardly enough. When you are researching a subject, the particular combination of tabs matters as much as the individual ones -- and, besides, selecting the tabs to open individually can be tedious if you are dealing with several dozen. And what happens if your session crashes before you have a chance to bookmark? You can address such concerns by installing Session Manager, a highly customizable add-on for preserving the state of the window after you close the browser.

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