basket

22 Notes-Taking Applications for Linux

When it comes to taking notes, a simple text editor may do for some. However, Linux offers a wide range of specialized programs for this task, some of them shipping advanced features and powerful formatting and organizing tools.

5 Notes-Taking Applications for Linux

BasKet This is one of my favorite KDE applications. BasKet is called by some a kill application for Linux, due to its completeness regarding features and a different approach compared to other notes applications.

Basket is a Great Ubuntu OneNote Clone

Basket allows you to organize and take notes through a clean, accessible interface. This program is a must-have for any Ubuntu user in college, and definitely beats shoving all of your notes into a text editor or word processor.

Taking note of Basket

Note-taking applications are far from scarce on GNU/Linux desktops. If your needs are simple, you can use KNotes in KDE or Sticky Notes in GNOME. If you want integration with address books and email, you may prefer Evolution's built-in Memos pane. For those who need more than basic notes, the increasingly sophisticated Tomboy may be a solution, assuming they have no objection to running an application built using Mono.

Ease Out Your Copy Paste Woes: Use Shantz Copy Basket

I’m sure you have copied/moved files on your computer from one place to another. And I’m sure often you have to do more than just “single-shot” copying that is copy a few files to one place, move a few to another, and copy yet some more to one more location. Well, I had to do this quite a few times (e.g. I ran out of disk space recently on a partition and had to empty out my “Movies” and “Songs” folders to move a few movies/songs each to all other partitions/disks according to the space available). Hence, I wrote this little command line program, which behaves like a basket.

Adding a basket tool to OpenOffice.org

No matter whether you are working on an article, an academic paper, or a novel, research is a crucial part of the writing process. And as with any research, you need a place to save your notes, ideas, relevant links, and text snippets. While there are tools like Basket Note Pads and the Zotero Firefox extension, wouldn't it be nice if you could store and manage your stuff directly from within OpenOffice.org? This is not only doable, but also easy to implement using just a Base database and a macro.

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