What makes Gobuntu different from gNewSense

Both Gobuntu and gNewSense fulfill the desires of the most exigent users when it is about respecting their freedoms. Almost identical at the software level, these two distributions differ in the relation they maintain with Ubuntu at the project level.

Dell Could Be A Big Key In Linux Adoption

Better hardware support - this is something we would all like to see happen. And it seems that it could happen, thanks in part to a Dell supported project known as DKMS (Dynamic Kernel Module Support).

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 3

Welcome to part 3 of our Linux Media Player Roundup. Today we'll be covering even more media players that are available for Linux, and even touching on a couple that do more than just play music, they also play your movies and dvd's.

PDF Printer in Gutsy

Printing to PDF isn’t setup by default in Gutsy, but it’s easy to implement. Just follow this guide. You’ll need the cups-pdf package, so run this command to install it if you don’t have it:

Ubuntu 7.10 & Fedora 8 Performance Compared

Back in March we had compared the performance of Ubuntu and Fedora as we tested Ubuntu 6.10 and Fedora 6 along with development versions of Ubuntu 7.04 and Fedora 7. During those benchmarks, Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5 had a slight lead over Fedora but the race was extremely close. In August we compared Ubuntu and Fedora again along with Xubuntu, Mandriva, and SimplyMEPIS, but using older PC hardware. In these benchmarks, the results were also close but Mandriva was the leader. Now with the release of Fedora 8 last week, we have run a new set of benchmarks comparing it to the month-old Ubuntu 7.10.

Book Review: The Official Ubuntu Book

Now, Linux enthusiast Jono Bacon and a team of writers have come out with a book to get the beginner started with Ubuntu. The second edition of The Official Ubuntu Book is a complete guide to using a system running Ubuntu Linux.

Inkscape and Gimp: Tracing a Cartoon Figure

This isn't really an Earth-shattering technique, but I've lucked out with it enough times to warrant a tutorial. It actually fits with the popular art-school methods for drawing a figure on paper, especially for drawing superhero-type figures.

Hugin: Software To Create Panoramic Photograph in Ubuntu Linux

I’ve always wanted to try and take panoramic photographs using my dad’s Nikon Coolpix 5200. That day finally arrived when I finally have the free time to do so last week when I’ve to accompany my dad traveling to the countryside of my hometown. Using a tripod, I took 4 sets of photographs with the help of Nikon built-in panorama helper function. I was excited and about to use a Windows computer to stitch those photograph using software supplied with the camera when suddenly I thought of searching for a similar application on my trusty Ubuntu box.

Preserving browser tab collections with Session Manager

Firefox includes an option for bookmarking all open tabs, but heavy users of tabs will find that this option is hardly enough. When you are researching a subject, the particular combination of tabs matters as much as the individual ones -- and, besides, selecting the tabs to open individually can be tedious if you are dealing with several dozen. And what happens if your session crashes before you have a chance to bookmark? You can address such concerns by installing Session Manager, a highly customizable add-on for preserving the state of the window after you close the browser.

When it comes to releasing operating systems, Ubuntu have it figured out

I know that it might not seem like it at times, but I’m a big Ubuntu fan.  I haven’t fully figured out how and where it fits into my computing ecosystem yet, but I know that it does have a place there.  One aspect of Ubuntu that particularly impresses me is the clear development time-line that is published and adhered to.  You always know what’s coming and when to expect it.

Ubuntuwire: developer services by the community for the community

The UbuntuWire project, created to get developer services to the community by community members, is the culmination of lots of hard work from Ubuntu Developers within the community outside Canonical. The aim is to provide hosting and support for the many community-developed tools that help to make Ubuntu run smoothly, particularly for those working on Ubuntu’s Universe and Multiverse.

How-to Enable Anti-Aliasing in Quake Wars Linux

Enemy Territory: Quake Wars is a team based first-person shooter game. It’s also the latest commercial game that runs natively on Linux.

I have been playing the demo for Linux, which includes most of what is in the full game, but only one map. It runs completely smooth on high graphics settings, but it will not let me enable anti-aliasing.

Dell denies ditching Ubuntu

Dell has denied reports that it's withdrawing its range of preinstalled Ubuntu Linux PCs in the UK.
Reports are circulating that the company has pulled its limited range of Ubuntu desktop and laptop PCs because of lack of demand.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter - Issue 65

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #65 for the week for the week November 4th - November 10th, 2007 is now available. In this issue we cover the UbuntuWire Community Network, a Christmas marketing campaign, the Michigan Packaging Jam, and, as always, much much more!

Mandriva 2008 VS Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

For those of you that follow my blog, you must have noticed that I’m a Mandriva user. Recently though, I took an interest in Ubuntu: I installed version 7.04 on a laptop, and it did look interesting, enough to make me doubt my commitment to Mandriva’s products.

A new look at fonts in Ubuntu

I’ve been playing around with fonts in Gutsy recently, so I thought I would document on this blog. As you probably already knew, Microsoft’s TrueType core fonts for the web are available in Ubuntu, in the package msttcorefonts. Just type the following at the command prompt to install:

Debfoster: Remove a package and its dependencies

We recently ran a review on Deborphan. Here is a review on a similar tool: Debfoster. Debfoster exists to tell you which packages are installed on your machine merely as dependencies for other packages. It then gives you the option of removing the package and its dependencies. It also remembers your previous responses so that it does not ask you about the same packages each time.

The Ubuntu Plunge - Day 5: Show Stopper!

It’s the moment I’ve been dreading all week, when I realize that I’ve hit a wall with Ubuntu and can go no further. Today, the wall in question is ACPI support, which in version 7.10 is simply broken.

Give One, Get One : One Laptop Per Child

I find myself today sitting in the Dallas/Ft Worth Airport in Texas waiting for my flight.  I had a few hours to kill so I picked up a copy of Time magazine to help pass the time.  (The one with the iPhone on the cover).  I was surprised to see an advertisement inside for the One Laptop Per Child project and the “Give 1, Get 1” promotion.

FOSS for cartoonists and illustrators

As more and more traditional publishers accept digital images, artists are turning to free and open source software (FOSS) tools to create cartoons and illustrations.

The day of the Linux desktop

I've been hearing the phrase "This is the year of the Linux desktop" for 10 years. For me, it's been a true statement for each of those years, because GNU/Linux has been my primary desktop operating system since 1997. But for most people around the world, this is the year of the the Windows desktop, same as it was last year and the year before.

Automated backups in Linux

One of the hardest things to get most users to do is to backup their computer. This is likely due to a false belief that hardware does not fail, or operating systems do not crash, or user error does not occur. Some might even believe that all data is recoverable, even in the worst possible situations. Sad to say, it's not. Besides, getting into the habit of backing up data is always a good thing, no matter what the system or the reason.

Configuring conditional window transparency in Compiz

Compiz brings a lot of bling to the Linux desktop, but with such an extensive selection of configurable features, it can sometimes be difficult to figure out how to take advantage of specific functionality. Several readers have asked me how to use Compiz to make menus and tooltips transparent, so I figured I'd share this trick with the Open Ended audience.

Why try another Linux distro?

I've been a full-fledged Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon user for more than a week now, I'm completely off Microsoft Windows and I couldn't be happier. For some reason, however, I keep getting emails and posts urging me to try other supposedly superior Linux distributions for newbies - PCLinuxOS and SimplyMEPIS, among others. Intrigued, I have decided to check this out for myself. Is Ubuntu the best or merely the best backed distro?

CellWriter: Open source handwriting recognition for Linux

Handwriting recognition, like its cousins speech recognition and optical character recognition, is a domain still dominated by proprietary products. Where there are Linux solutions, such as the one in Nokia's Maemo Internet tablets, they are often closed source plugins protected by patent claims. Thus I was pleasantly surprised to find CellWriter, a small, straightforward handwriting recognition tool that integrates easily with modern Linux desktops.

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